Tiffani Reardon

Decorative Jekyll Island sunset

Courses Taken in the Bachelor of Arts in English Program

Major

Tiffani and President Dan Papp at Graduation
Course Title Course Description
ENGL 2145 - Introduction to English Studies This course introduces students to the reading, writing, research, and critical strategies essential to KSU English Studies. The course draws connections among the four content areas in the English Department (Literature, Language, Writing, and Theory) and focuses on their relationship to broader social and personal contexts, enabling students to make informed choices about their program of study and their careers.

A Close Reading of Rapunzel by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm
ENGL 2160 - American Literature Survey This survey of American literature from its beginnings to the present introduces English and Secondary English Education majors to the historical periods and major trends and figures of American literature.

Precious Jones's Changing Individualism and Its Effects on her Attitude toward Louis Farrakhan

The Enlightenment in Relation to Franklin and the American Revolution
ENGL 2172 - British Literature to 1660 This survey of American literature from its beginnings to the present introduces English and Secondary English Education majors to the historical periods and major trends and figures of American literature.

A Christmas Carol and The Dead

The Country Wife Close Reading

Victorian Gender Roles in “Goblin Market”
ENGL 2174 - British Literature 1660 to Present This survey of British literature from 1660 to the present introduces English and Secondary English Education majors to the historical periods and major trends and figures of British literature.

Love, Race, and Sexuality in “Indissoluble Matrimony”

Crossing Love’s Boundaries: What Was She Thinking?: Notes on a Scandal: A Novel by Zoë Heller and Maurice by E. M. Forster

Where is the line?
ENGL 3035 - Introduction to Language and Linguistics This course analyzes the nature of human language. It includes an introduction to speech sounds, morphology, and syntax. A heavy emphasis is placed on the social and pedagogical implications of modern linguistic theory, which includes an examination of issues such as Standard English, dialect variation, language acquisition, or English as a Second Language.

Morphology, Semantics, and Style in "Jabberwocky"

Piecing the Parts Together: The Human Body
ENGL 3232 - Topics in Drama This course is a study of selected topics, authors, or periods of dramatic literature. The course also addresses the fundamental literary generic characteristics of dramatic form, including plot, character, action, and setting, as well as the conventions of dramatic genres, such as tragedy, comedy, tragicomedy, closet, and narrative drama.

Peking Opera

The Man Who Turned into a Stick
ENGL 3340 - Ethnic Literatures (Post-Colonial Literature of India) This course is a study of literature using ethnicity as the primary category of analysis. Individual offerings of the course might survey a range of ethnic literatures (e.g., Asian American, Chicano, Native American, Jewish) or explore one such body of texts (e.g., Caribbean literatures).

Defining Diaspora, Hybrid, and Creole in Lahiri’s Interpreter of Maladies

Midnight’s Children and Cracking India as Film
ENGL 3360 - Major African American Writers This course concerns the development of African American literature with emphasis on major writers defining trends, movements, genres, and themes.

Malcolm X and Nelson Mandela

Ownership at its Best: Slaves vs. Pets
ENGL 3398 - Internship This course is a supervised, credit-earning work experience of one semester with a previously approved business firm, private agency, or government agency.

Edupunks and a Higher Education Transformation

Annotated Bibliography
ENGL 4230 - Theory-Based Studies in Literature Concentration on the interpretive strategies and conceptual framework of one of the major paradigms of contemporary literary theory, with attention to the ways in which those paradigms enable the study of a select group of texts, both literary and nonliterary. Topics may include Feminist theory, Marxism, Post-Colonialism, Psychoanalytic Criticism, Cultural Materialism, Ethnic studies, Gender studies, New-Historicism, and Reader Response theories.

“Idolatry”: a Reader Response Analysis
ENGL 4340 - Shakespeare This course is a study of selected comedies, histories, and tragedies, covering the range of Shakespeare’s dramatic art. It may include dramatic form and poetic composition as commentaries on the dramatic genres and an examination of performance theory and practice.

Much Ado about Nothing Dramaturgical Analysis

Othello Act 5, Scene 2, Lines 126-171

Close Reading: Othello
ENGL 4470 - 19th Century British Literature Studies in Romantic and Victorian literature, from the 1780s to the end of the nineteenth century, examining such aesthetic and social themes as the nature and role of the artist, the impulse toward gothicism, the rise of the autobiography, responses to industrialization, and the conflict between tradition and change, as these are expressed in representative texts of the period.

"Jabberwocky": Nonsense Language in Relation to a Moral of Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There

Fantasy in Children’s literature from the Victorian Era: Why was it so effective in getting the lessons across?
ENGL 4570 - 20th Century British Literature A study of representative twentieth-century British literature.
ENGL 4620 - Senior Seminar (Native American Literature) Detailed study of a literary, artistic, or cultural movement, theme, trend, or philosophy with literary texts as the focal point but exploring works in related fields, culminating in the preparation of an original, substantial, and researched seminar paper, which is to be presented orally and formally. The course will be open to English and other majors.

The Night Chant as Evidence of Abel's Death in House Made of Dawn

Thomas Builds-the-Fire as a Community Builder: a Character Analysis of The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven and Smoke Signals

Annotated Bibliography for "Thomas Builds-the-Fire..."
WRIT 3100 - Poetry Writing This course is a workshop approach to poetry writing that emphasizes original writing, revision, and analysis and response from classmates. Some attention is given to the work of established writers as models.

Bird by Bird Response
WRIT 3111 - Professional Editing This is a course in editing as a practice and a profession. It focuses on editorial roles and responsibilities and introduces students to the skills, principles, and methods of editing. Course assignments provide ample practice in applying the techniques of editing, including editing for grammar, punctuation, and style. This course prepares students for careers in publishing and writing.

Client Project - Contract

Client Project - Markup

Client Project - Letter
WRIT 3140 - Technical Writing This is a course in the analysis and writing of business and technical documents. This course emphasizes audience awareness, effective design and organization, clarity and correctness, and mastery of writing forms frequently encountered in the workplace.

Definition and Description Memo—Ethics of Teaching Creationism Alone

Ethical Issues with Teaching Science Based on Creationism: Proposal Memo

Ethics of Teaching Science Based on Creationism: A Recommendation Report

General Education

A senior photo of Tiffani
Course Title Course Description
ECON 1100 - Global Economics Analysis of economic decision-making in a global setting. Examines the fundamental questions of economics as they relate to individuals, firms, and governments operating in an open economy. Topics covered include: a comparison of economic systems, how a market system works, the role of government in the economy, the basis for international trade, the dynamics of the global monetary system, and the impact of technology on economic growth.
ENGL 1101 - Composition I Focuses on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation. Also includes introductory use of a variety of research skills.
ENGL 1102 - Composition II Focuses on developing writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101. Emphasizes interpretation and evaluation and advanced research methods.
ENGL 2110 - World Literature This course is a survey of world literature that explores human experience by examining diverse aesthetic and cultural perspectives from ancient to modern times.
HIST 1110 - Introduction to World History An overview of world history that provides an introduction to the origin and development of the world’s societies and their political, cultural, and economic traditions
HIST 2112 - America Since 1890 Examines the major themes of American history since 1890, the multicultural nature of contemporary U.S. civilization, and the nation's role in the global arena.
HPS 1000 - Fitness for Living Emphasis on the importance of physical activity, nutrition, stress and weight management, and health-related fitness components. Topics will be developed with practical applications to one's life-style including opportunities to assess selected fitness, nutritional and activity patterns, and to develop and participate in a personalized physical activity program.
MATH 1106 - Elementary Applied Calculus Uses techniques of college algebra and elementary calculus to analyze and model real world phenomena. The emphasis will be on applications using an intuitive approach to the mathematics rather than formal development. Topics include graphs, derivatives, and integrals of functions. The course incorporates collaborative learning, oral and written reports, and technology.
MATH 1111 - College Algebra This course provides an in-depth study of the properties of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions as needed for calculus. Emphasis is on using algebraic and graphical techniques for solving problems involving linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions.
KSU 1101 - KSU Freshman Seminar This course is a first-year seminar designed to help students develop college-level skills for academic success by focusing on life skills, strategies for academic success, connecting with campus and community, and foundations for global learning. This course guides student through the transition from high school to higher education. It satisfies the first-year curriculum requirement by meeting the four learning outcomes of the first-year seminars.
POLS 1101 - American Government This course provides an in-depth study of the properties of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions as needed for calculus. Emphasis is on using algebraic and graphical techniques for solving problems involving linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions.
SCI 1101 - Science, Society, and the Environment I This course is the first in a two part sequence that fulfills the general education science requirement. Using the context of environmental issues it introduces students to the basic nature of matter, energy, and living systems and to the nature of science. Emphasis is placed on making decisions about scientific issues.
SCI 1102 - Science, Society, and the Environment II This course is the second in a two part sequence that fulfills the general education science requirement. Using the context of environmental issues, it introduces students to the basic skills and scientific understandings needed by educated citizens to make informed decisions about scientific issues.
SOCI 2201 - Principles of Sociology An overview of sociology which emphasizes the social nature of human behavior, including an introduction to culture, social structure, socialization, deviance, stratification, family, gender, religion, demography, and complex organization.
TPS 1107 - Arts in Society: Theatre and Performance This interactive course examines the role of theatre in society through the study of dramatic works and performance events within their cultural and historical contexts. Course assignments promote understanding of the creative process and develop skills in critical analysis, global perspectives, and collaboration. Attendance is required at live performances, including some events with paid admission.

Languages and Electives

A senior photo of Tiffani
Course Title Course Description
COM 2135 - Writing for Public Communication COM 2135 covers application and practice of writing form and style particular to communication industry careers, such as journalism, public relations and human resource areas. Includes weekly writing assignments.
FREN 1001 - Introduction to French II This course is an introduction to French language and culture, stressing progressive acquisition of effective communication skills in both the written and spoken language and an understanding of the practices and products of French and Francophone cultures.
FREN 1002 - Introduction to French II Introduction to French language and culture, “Part II,” stressing continued, progressive acquisition of effective communication skills in both the written and spoken language and an understanding of the practices and products of French and Francophone cultures
FREN 2001 - Intermediate French I The student will continue to develop proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and learn to communicate in culturally appropriate ways.
IT 2101 - Computers and Your World Students explore how computers and the Internet have revolutionized society, and they become well-rounded, informed and curious users of computing technologies. This course is comprised of three modules: (1) hardware and operating systems, (2) spreadsheet, presentation, and database software, and (3) networks, the Internet, and information literacy. Other topics explored include security, privacy, globalization, Web 2.0, diversity, and ethics
ITAL 1001 - Introduction to Italian I Introduction to Italian language and culture stressing progressive acquisition of effective communication skills in both the written and spoken language and an understanding of the practices and products of Italian culture.
SPAN 1002 - Introduction to Spanish II Introduction to Spanish language and culture, “Part II,” stressing continued, progressive acquisition of effective communication skills in both the written and spoken language and an understanding of the practices and products of Hispanic cultures.
SPAN 2001 - Intermediate Spanish I The student will continue to develop proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and learn to communicate in culturally appropriate ways.
SPAN 2002 - Intermediate Spanish II Students continue to increase linguistic and cultural proficiency through the use of a variety of materials and activities. Course will serve as a transition between intermediate and upper-level courses in Spanish.